Meet Safiyyah Iqbal, a Functional Morphologist specialised in digital analysis!

Safiyyah is a PhD student at the Evolutionary Studies Institute (ESI) situated at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. She focusses her research on understanding the form related to the function or vice versa of prehistoric species. This allows her to expand her abilities by studying a variety of species in different environments.  During Safiyyahs research at the ESI, she underwent training on the microCT scanner and helped advice the Palaeontology honour students working with GM methods.

On top of Mauna Kea

Meet Dr. Arianna Piccialli, a planetary scientist studying Mars and Venus atmospheres, and passionate about science communication!

Arianna is a postdoc at the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy in Brussels, Belgium. Her research is focused on studying the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. She is originally from the sunny city of Naples, in Italy, of which she misses the beautiful view of the blue sea. She got her PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research located in the small village of Katlenburg-Lindau, in Germany. As a researcher and as a woman in science she is convinced of the importance of combining her research activity with that of science outreach.

Get Involved

Why not start right now?

Most recent portraits

Meet Safiyyah Iqbal, a Functional Morphologist specialised in digital analysis!

Safiyyah is a PhD student at the Evolutionary Studies Institute (ESI) situated at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. She focusses her research on understanding the form related to the function or vice versa of prehistoric species. This allows her to expand her abilities by studying a variety of species in different environments.  During Safiyyahs research at the ESI, she underwent training on the microCT scanner and helped advice the Palaeontology honour students working with GM methods.

On top of Mauna Kea

Meet Dr. Arianna Piccialli, a planetary scientist studying Mars and Venus atmospheres, and passionate about science communication!

Arianna is a postdoc at the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy in Brussels, Belgium. Her research is focused on studying the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. She is originally from the sunny city of Naples, in Italy, of which she misses the beautiful view of the blue sea. She got her PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research located in the small village of Katlenburg-Lindau, in Germany. As a researcher and as a woman in science she is convinced of the importance of combining her research activity with that of science outreach.

Most recent research

fat female seal

How do seals regulate their fat stores?

Being too fat is bad for humans. But for seals, being fat is essential. They use blubber to stay warm in the water and to supply fat to fuel their metabolism when they come ashore. There’s a lot we don’t understand about how they regulate their fat reserves. How can they be so fat and stay healthy? How do they withstand and manage the big changes they experience in fat stores throughout the year? How does their energy balance respond to rapid natural or human-induced changes in their environment?  In this Royal Society and NERC funded collaboration between Abertay University, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Plymouth University,  Dr Kimberley Bennett borrowed a method from biomedical science to investigate how seal fat works to start to answer these questions.

Feature image

Targeted enhancement of placental function.

Four years after Lisa´s Masters of Research in Maternal and Fetal Health at The University of Manchester, her paper “Placental Homing Peptide-microRNA Inhibitor Conjugates for Targeted Enhancement of Intrinsic Placental Growth Signaling” is finally published in Theranostics. In simple terms, it’s all about targeting the placenta in order to enhance its function by delivering therapeutic molecules to it. Here, Lisa´s going to talk about why on earth they did this research, how they did it, the results and what they mean!

Most recent guides

Most recent articles

How do we encourage more women to get into STEM?

This article is a summary of a report published by the Royal Society of Chemistry on the diversity landscape of the Chemical Science. The vast majority of this report is focused on women, which are clearly underrepresented in chemistry, and science in general. Women account for only 35% of scientists in STEM and earn less than their male counterparts. The current research suggests that women are less confident when it comes to putting themselves forward for leadership positions or in salary negotiations.