SRscienceoutfit

Meet Susan Rapley, a behavioural neuroscientist and science communicator, passionate about sharing knowledge!

Susan has recently finished her PhD work at the University of Canterbury (NZ) where she studied a novel signalling system in the brain and how it is affected during memory loss. Susan earned her BSc and Honours degrees in Psychology before completing a Master’s in behavioural neuroscience, all of which has turned her into more biologist than a psychologist. She is currently between jobs and waiting to defend her Ph.D., but intends to work in Science Communication and combine her passions for teaching, data, and teaching about data.

Meet Julienne O’Rourke, a biochemist & molecular biologist investigating how DNA repairs itself!

Julienne uses biochemistry & molecular biology to understand how the cell recognises damaged DNA, and subsequently, repairs it – a process that goes wrong in cancer. After completing a Bachelor of Biomedicine (Pharmacology) at the University of Melbourne, Julienne joined the Genome Stability Unit at St Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research to complete her Ph.D. Between experiments, Julienne is the Chair of the 2017 EMBL Australia Postgraduate Symposium, a professional mentor at Asylum Seeker Resource Centre, and is the digital communications coordinator for Melbourne Medical School.

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Targeted enhancement of placental function.

Four years after Lisa´s Masters of Research in Maternal and Fetal Health at The University of Manchester, her paper “Placental Homing Peptide-microRNA Inhibitor Conjugates for Targeted Enhancement of Intrinsic Placental Growth Signaling” is finally published in Theranostics. In simple terms, it’s all about targeting the placenta in order to enhance its function by delivering therapeutic molecules to it. Here, Lisa´s going to talk about why on earth they did this research, how they did it, the results and what they mean!

Meet Charlene Ronquillo, a nursing informatician/implementation scientist interested in figuring out how to develop and implement digital health technologies!

Charlene is a PhD student at the University of British Columbia School of Nursing and an Associate Research Fellow in implementation science with the PenCLAHRC at the University of Exeter. Her PhD work investigates the factors that influence nurses’ decisions and behaviours related to the adoption and usage of mobile technologies as part of their work. Her work with the PenCLAHRC is focused on understanding the science of implementation in health systems and all its accompanying complexities.

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SRscienceoutfit

Meet Susan Rapley, a behavioural neuroscientist and science communicator, passionate about sharing knowledge!

Susan has recently finished her PhD work at the University of Canterbury (NZ) where she studied a novel signalling system in the brain and how it is affected during memory loss. Susan earned her BSc and Honours degrees in Psychology before completing a Master’s in behavioural neuroscience, all of which has turned her into more biologist than a psychologist. She is currently between jobs and waiting to defend her Ph.D., but intends to work in Science Communication and combine her passions for teaching, data, and teaching about data.

Meet Julienne O’Rourke, a biochemist & molecular biologist investigating how DNA repairs itself!

Julienne uses biochemistry & molecular biology to understand how the cell recognises damaged DNA, and subsequently, repairs it – a process that goes wrong in cancer. After completing a Bachelor of Biomedicine (Pharmacology) at the University of Melbourne, Julienne joined the Genome Stability Unit at St Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research to complete her Ph.D. Between experiments, Julienne is the Chair of the 2017 EMBL Australia Postgraduate Symposium, a professional mentor at Asylum Seeker Resource Centre, and is the digital communications coordinator for Melbourne Medical School.

Meet Charlene Ronquillo, a nursing informatician/implementation scientist interested in figuring out how to develop and implement digital health technologies!

Charlene is a PhD student at the University of British Columbia School of Nursing and an Associate Research Fellow in implementation science with the PenCLAHRC at the University of Exeter. Her PhD work investigates the factors that influence nurses’ decisions and behaviours related to the adoption and usage of mobile technologies as part of their work. Her work with the PenCLAHRC is focused on understanding the science of implementation in health systems and all its accompanying complexities.

Most recent research

Feature image

Targeted enhancement of placental function.

Four years after Lisa´s Masters of Research in Maternal and Fetal Health at The University of Manchester, her paper “Placental Homing Peptide-microRNA Inhibitor Conjugates for Targeted Enhancement of Intrinsic Placental Growth Signaling” is finally published in Theranostics. In simple terms, it’s all about targeting the placenta in order to enhance its function by delivering therapeutic molecules to it. Here, Lisa´s going to talk about why on earth they did this research, how they did it, the results and what they mean!

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Problems of scientific publishing – Is it scientists vs. journals? 

I clearly remember the moment when my first paper was published – oh, how proud I was. Finally, I felt like a proper scientist! When I told my (non-academic) family about it, one of the first things they asked was Great, so finally you get something out of your work! How much did they pay you for it? My answer, actually a little bit embarrassed: Uhm, nothing. But I did not have to pay THEM for publishing it, so that´s great! They did not get it. Why should they?

The paper review, or: emotional rollercoaster, here I come!

You handed in your first paper a while ago, and now you are waiting on the journal’s response. You are annoyed with them taking so long to finish their review, but on the other hand, you are getting really nervous every time you open your e-mails because they might have answered you?

Maybe your first paper was already rejected, or you had it accepted with major revision, and now you are absolutely terrified and have the impression that you might be incapable of being a proper scientist?

It´s not just you!