Dr. Isabella Mandl in Moheli, Comoros

Meet Dr. Isabella Mandl, who is working towards protecting animals by understanding their behaviour!

Isabella was born in Austria but spent her early years in the UK. She was awarded BSc in Biology from the University of Vienna, Austria in 2011 and then went on to do a MSc by Research in Animal Cognition and Welfare at the University of Lincoln, UK. Isabellas PhD was co-supervised by the Bristol Zoological Society and awarded by the University of Bristol, UK, in 2018. She currently works for the NGO Dahari in Comoros, where she is a technical assistant to the ecology research team. Isabellas interest in animal behaviour stems from a desire to understand the world around her (some may call it control-issues) and her passion for conservation comes from seeing first-hand what happens to the natural world if we do not protect it.

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Dr. Isabella Mandl in Moheli, Comoros

Meet Dr. Isabella Mandl, who is working towards protecting animals by understanding their behaviour!

Isabella was born in Austria but spent her early years in the UK. She was awarded BSc in Biology from the University of Vienna, Austria in 2011 and then went on to do a MSc by Research in Animal Cognition and Welfare at the University of Lincoln, UK. Isabellas PhD was co-supervised by the Bristol Zoological Society and awarded by the University of Bristol, UK, in 2018. She currently works for the NGO Dahari in Comoros, where she is a technical assistant to the ecology research team. Isabellas interest in animal behaviour stems from a desire to understand the world around her (some may call it control-issues) and her passion for conservation comes from seeing first-hand what happens to the natural world if we do not protect it.

In the field in New Mexico

Meet Amanda Rossillo, a paleoanthropologist studying how we are related to extinct human species!

Amanda is a PhD student in Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University studying human evolution. Her research uses 3D models of fossils to clarify a problem known as “the muddle in the middle,” which describes the poorly understood evolutionary relationships of human species during a time period called the Middle Pleistocene epoch (130,000-800,000 years ago). She is also interested in science outreach and education, especially concerning controversial topics in science.

Arwen in the lab

Meet Arwen Nugteren, Chemistry student, lab assistant and passionate science communicator!

Arwen is an enthusiastic and passionate undergraduate student in the wonderful field of Chemistry with a grand plan to go into research. Until then, she’s working as a lab assistant, preparing samples and extracting DNA in an animal genetics lab. She’s an active science communicator through her science blog, Scientia Potentia Est and on Twitter because she thinks science is fascinating and wants to share knowledge with the world.

Most recent research

fat female seal

How do seals regulate their fat stores?

Being too fat is bad for humans. But for seals, being fat is essential. They use blubber to stay warm in the water and to supply fat to fuel their metabolism when they come ashore. There’s a lot we don’t understand about how they regulate their fat reserves. How can they be so fat and stay healthy? How do they withstand and manage the big changes they experience in fat stores throughout the year? How does their energy balance respond to rapid natural or human-induced changes in their environment?  In this Royal Society and NERC funded collaboration between Abertay University, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Plymouth University,  Dr Kimberley Bennett borrowed a method from biomedical science to investigate how seal fat works to start to answer these questions.

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Science Journalism

Science Journalism: The Communication Channel between Complex Research Findings and the General Public

Clinical speaking, the aim of a science journalist is to render very detailed, specific, and often jargon-laden information provided by scientists into a form that non-scientists can understand and appreciate while still communicating the information accurately. We want to be your communication channel… your bridge between complex scientific data and the theories of the general public.

Harriet Brooks

A new play tells the story of the 1st Canadian Female Nuclear Physicist!

Actor and playwright Ellen Denny is on a mission to tell the world about her great great aunt Harriet Brooks.

Growing up, Ellen knew there was a scientist in her family, but it wasn’t until she read Harriet Brooks: Pioneer Nuclear Scientist by Geoffrey Rayner-Canham and Marelene Rayner-Canham that she began to understand who her great great aunt truly was, and what she was able to accomplish. As an established theatre actor curious to try playwriting, Harriet’s story of perseverance and sacrifice was the igniting spark for Ellen to write her first play, entitled Wonder. Now, more than four years into the creation process, her passion for telling this story has only increased…