Stephanie and Dr. Kay Behrensmeyer at a fossil dinosaur locality, Montana

Meet Stephanie Canington: an anatomist who studies how lemurs eat!

Stephanie is a PhD Candidate in the Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  She studies the physical and mechanical challenges of foods consumed by lemurs and how the masticatory morphology of primates is adapted for such challenges.  She completed her Bachelors in Anthropology at Auburn University while completing internships at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in the Division of Mammals.

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Stephanie and Dr. Kay Behrensmeyer at a fossil dinosaur locality, Montana

Meet Stephanie Canington: an anatomist who studies how lemurs eat!

Stephanie is a PhD Candidate in the Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  She studies the physical and mechanical challenges of foods consumed by lemurs and how the masticatory morphology of primates is adapted for such challenges.  She completed her Bachelors in Anthropology at Auburn University while completing internships at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in the Division of Mammals.

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fat female seal

How do seals regulate their fat stores?

Being too fat is bad for humans. But for seals, being fat is essential. They use blubber to stay warm in the water and to supply fat to fuel their metabolism when they come ashore. There’s a lot we don’t understand about how they regulate their fat reserves. How can they be so fat and stay healthy? How do they withstand and manage the big changes they experience in fat stores throughout the year? How does their energy balance respond to rapid natural or human-induced changes in their environment?  In this Royal Society and NERC funded collaboration between Abertay University, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Plymouth University,  Dr Kimberley Bennett borrowed a method from biomedical science to investigate how seal fat works to start to answer these questions.

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Targeted enhancement of placental function.

Four years after Lisa´s Masters of Research in Maternal and Fetal Health at The University of Manchester, her paper “Placental Homing Peptide-microRNA Inhibitor Conjugates for Targeted Enhancement of Intrinsic Placental Growth Signaling” is finally published in Theranostics. In simple terms, it’s all about targeting the placenta in order to enhance its function by delivering therapeutic molecules to it. Here, Lisa´s going to talk about why on earth they did this research, how they did it, the results and what they mean!

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