Meet İpek Saralar, a Turkish mathematics teacher conducting research on Mathematics Education!

İpek is a qualified mathematics teacher who works on designing lessons to improve students’ understanding of spatial geometry. She has worked, volunteered and trained in numerous schools in Turkey and England. She graduated from the Middle East Technical University in June 2014 with a BSc and in April 2016 with an MSc in Mathematics Education. She joined the University of Nottingham’s Learning Science Research Institute in September 2015 as an MA student in Learning, Technology and Education. Successfully completing the requirements for her MA degree in September 2016, she continued her studies with a PhD in Education in the same institute. She is currently a doctoral researcher at the University of Nottingham in the School of Education.

Meet Teresa Ambrosio – scientist – woman – advocate!

Teresa is a PhD student in Sustainable Chemistry at the University of Nottingham. She graduated cum laude from La Sapienza – University of Rome in 2014. Her current research is based on C-H activations and how to develop more sustainable chemical reactions. Teresa is the Founder of phdtosuccess.com, and she runs a YouTube channel (Teresa Ambrosio) where she talks about her research and interesting facts about the periodic table. You can also find Teresa on Instagram @phd_to_success and Twitter @teres4amb.

How do we encourage more women to get into STEM?

This article is a summary of a report published by the Royal Society of Chemistry on the diversity landscape of the Chemical Science. The vast majority of this report is focused on women, which are clearly underrepresented in chemistry, and science in general. Women account for only 35% of scientists in STEM and earn less than their male counterparts. The current research suggests that women are less confident when it comes to putting themselves forward for leadership positions or in salary negotiations.

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Meet İpek Saralar, a Turkish mathematics teacher conducting research on Mathematics Education!

İpek is a qualified mathematics teacher who works on designing lessons to improve students’ understanding of spatial geometry. She has worked, volunteered and trained in numerous schools in Turkey and England. She graduated from the Middle East Technical University in June 2014 with a BSc and in April 2016 with an MSc in Mathematics Education. She joined the University of Nottingham’s Learning Science Research Institute in September 2015 as an MA student in Learning, Technology and Education. Successfully completing the requirements for her MA degree in September 2016, she continued her studies with a PhD in Education in the same institute. She is currently a doctoral researcher at the University of Nottingham in the School of Education.

Meet Teresa Ambrosio – scientist – woman – advocate!

Teresa is a PhD student in Sustainable Chemistry at the University of Nottingham. She graduated cum laude from La Sapienza – University of Rome in 2014. Her current research is based on C-H activations and how to develop more sustainable chemical reactions. Teresa is the Founder of phdtosuccess.com, and she runs a YouTube channel (Teresa Ambrosio) where she talks about her research and interesting facts about the periodic table. You can also find Teresa on Instagram @phd_to_success and Twitter @teres4amb.

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Meet Dr. Kaitlyn Sadtler, an immunoengineer working on how our body’s defense system can help build new tissue!

Kaitlyn is a TED2018 Fellow who works on how our immune system can help regenerate tissue. She graduated from University of Maryland Baltimore County in 2011 with a BS in Biological Sciences, after which she joined a molecular immunology lab at the National Institutes of Health for 1 year of postbaccalaurate training. Going into graduate school at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Kaitlyn continued her work on the immune system and in 2016 earned a Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, on the role of helper T cells in regenerating injured muscle. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Chemical Engineering department working on wound healing and materials used in treatments for type-1 diabetes.

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fat female seal

How do seals regulate their fat stores?

Being too fat is bad for humans. But for seals, being fat is essential. They use blubber to stay warm in the water and to supply fat to fuel their metabolism when they come ashore. There’s a lot we don’t understand about how they regulate their fat reserves. How can they be so fat and stay healthy? How do they withstand and manage the big changes they experience in fat stores throughout the year? How does their energy balance respond to rapid natural or human-induced changes in their environment?  In this Royal Society and NERC funded collaboration between Abertay University, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Plymouth University,  Dr Kimberley Bennett borrowed a method from biomedical science to investigate how seal fat works to start to answer these questions.

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Targeted enhancement of placental function.

Four years after Lisa´s Masters of Research in Maternal and Fetal Health at The University of Manchester, her paper “Placental Homing Peptide-microRNA Inhibitor Conjugates for Targeted Enhancement of Intrinsic Placental Growth Signaling” is finally published in Theranostics. In simple terms, it’s all about targeting the placenta in order to enhance its function by delivering therapeutic molecules to it. Here, Lisa´s going to talk about why on earth they did this research, how they did it, the results and what they mean!

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How do we encourage more women to get into STEM?

This article is a summary of a report published by the Royal Society of Chemistry on the diversity landscape of the Chemical Science. The vast majority of this report is focused on women, which are clearly underrepresented in chemistry, and science in general. Women account for only 35% of scientists in STEM and earn less than their male counterparts. The current research suggests that women are less confident when it comes to putting themselves forward for leadership positions or in salary negotiations.