Amy in the lab

Meet Amy Bottomley, a microbiologist working out how bacteria grow and divide!

Amy Bottomley is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the i3 institute, University of Technology Sydney (UTS).  Her research focuses on how bacteria grow and divide, and how this process is regulated under different conditions such as nutrient limitation or during infection.  She is also passionate about developing science careers for young people, including giving a voice to early career researchers, and engaging with a younger audience to get them interested in science.

Meet Annelies Van de Ven, an archaeologist working in the Middle East!

Annelies is a postgraduate researcher looking into the archaeology of the Middle East, and its ramifications in the present. She recently submitted her Ph.D. thesis at the University of Melbourne in Australia, and is currently waiting (quite impatiently and nervously) for her examiner reports. Before this, she completed a Masters at the University of St Andrews in Scotland looking at the politics of archaeology in the Israel-Palestine conflict. Annelies thinks that the deep past and its material traces strongly influence how we identify ourselves in the present. These things impact how we engage with our environment and with one another. By better understanding what people did in the past, the complexity of their actions, and how this relates to the present, she believes we can improve our lives and interactions in the present.

Alex Alexandrova

Meet Dr. Alex Alexandrova, a researcher who brings accelerator science to the industry!

Dr Alex Alexandrova was a Marie Sklodowska Curie Fellow within the Department of Physics at Liverpool University between 2012 and 2015, and she belonged to the LA3NET (Lasers for Applications at Accelerator facilities) training network. She has recently co-founded technology company D-Beam with Head of Liverpool University Physics Department Carsten Welsch. Her goal is to develop better tools to measure particle beams in accelerators, with applications in research, industry and the medical field.

In my office

Meet Jacinta Yap, a particle accelerator scientist working on proton beam therapy!

Jacinta Yap is a Marie Sklodowska Curie Fellow in the QUASAR group of the University of Liverpool, headed by Professor Carsten Welsch, and is based at the Cockcroft Institute, UK. She is also part of the Optimising Medical Accelerator (OMA) training network. She uses her expertise in accelerator science to maximize the healthcare benefits from proton beam therapy, a new type of cancer treatment that is more efficient than current radiotherapy techniques.

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Most recent portraits

Amy in the lab

Meet Amy Bottomley, a microbiologist working out how bacteria grow and divide!

Amy Bottomley is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the i3 institute, University of Technology Sydney (UTS).  Her research focuses on how bacteria grow and divide, and how this process is regulated under different conditions such as nutrient limitation or during infection.  She is also passionate about developing science careers for young people, including giving a voice to early career researchers, and engaging with a younger audience to get them interested in science.

Meet Annelies Van de Ven, an archaeologist working in the Middle East!

Annelies is a postgraduate researcher looking into the archaeology of the Middle East, and its ramifications in the present. She recently submitted her Ph.D. thesis at the University of Melbourne in Australia, and is currently waiting (quite impatiently and nervously) for her examiner reports. Before this, she completed a Masters at the University of St Andrews in Scotland looking at the politics of archaeology in the Israel-Palestine conflict. Annelies thinks that the deep past and its material traces strongly influence how we identify ourselves in the present. These things impact how we engage with our environment and with one another. By better understanding what people did in the past, the complexity of their actions, and how this relates to the present, she believes we can improve our lives and interactions in the present.

Alex Alexandrova

Meet Dr. Alex Alexandrova, a researcher who brings accelerator science to the industry!

Dr Alex Alexandrova was a Marie Sklodowska Curie Fellow within the Department of Physics at Liverpool University between 2012 and 2015, and she belonged to the LA3NET (Lasers for Applications at Accelerator facilities) training network. She has recently co-founded technology company D-Beam with Head of Liverpool University Physics Department Carsten Welsch. Her goal is to develop better tools to measure particle beams in accelerators, with applications in research, industry and the medical field.

Most recent research

fat female seal

How do seals regulate their fat stores?

Being too fat is bad for humans. But for seals, being fat is essential. They use blubber to stay warm in the water and to supply fat to fuel their metabolism when they come ashore. There’s a lot we don’t understand about how they regulate their fat reserves. How can they be so fat and stay healthy? How do they withstand and manage the big changes they experience in fat stores throughout the year? How does their energy balance respond to rapid natural or human-induced changes in their environment?  In this Royal Society and NERC funded collaboration between Abertay University, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Plymouth University,  Dr Kimberley Bennett borrowed a method from biomedical science to investigate how seal fat works to start to answer these questions.

Feature image

Targeted enhancement of placental function.

Four years after Lisa´s Masters of Research in Maternal and Fetal Health at The University of Manchester, her paper “Placental Homing Peptide-microRNA Inhibitor Conjugates for Targeted Enhancement of Intrinsic Placental Growth Signaling” is finally published in Theranostics. In simple terms, it’s all about targeting the placenta in order to enhance its function by delivering therapeutic molecules to it. Here, Lisa´s going to talk about why on earth they did this research, how they did it, the results and what they mean!

Most recent guides

Help! I have to do a statistics course!

Whether the idea thrills you or chills you, data and its analysis are central components of all sciences. Data is the main story in any piece of research, and as such most disciplines expect you to learn how to analyse, interpret and communicate this vital information. This can come as a shock to some people, especially those entering into “social sciences.” Fear not! After seven years of tutoring and lecturing in statistics for psychology, I have analysed a sample of over 1000 new statistics students and the results are in. Here are 10 tips to give you a leg up in any mandatory statistics-for-sciences course you have to undertake.

Most recent articles

Vine Forest

It’s not just in STEM: Sexism outside of work holds scientists back

Sexism in STEM is rampant; you don’t need me to tell you that. From 113 pages of sexual assault/harassment allegations (U of R, 2017) to the Google engineer memo (also 2017), there are dozens of examples each year of sexism inside STEM environments. But it isn’t just the sexism that women experience in their fields – at conferences, in the office/lab, etc. – that makes it harder for women to succeed in STEM. Misogyny and sexism outside of the workplace can also negatively impact women’s performance at work, and thus the progress of their career and their science. How do two things, seemingly happening in different spheres, overlap?

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Professional Responsibility in Research Science (and the lack thereof)!

The job of a scientist is immensely rewarding – but also technically challenging, and often riddled with administrative and institutional red tape. Learning how to navigate these challenges is critical for mastering the practice of science and advancing early career scientists (students, interns, post-docs, etc). The role of good mentors can set the stage for success. However, there is little discussion about the damage that can be wrought by a bad mentor.